Monday, November 18, 2013

More Google Earth Finds


Continuing the strange, interesting and sometimes bizarre discovered by people on Google Earth . . .

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The above pentagram can be found in Kazakhstan, is 366 metres/1,200 feet in diameter and is the outline of a park made in the form of a star. Whether the park is used for devil worship and sabbats is unknown (joke).

A massive face of Jesus in Hungary.

There is no explanation for this large plane among trees in Brooklyn.

The fronds of Palm Island in Dubai.

A field in Piedmont in Italy contains a giant knitted rabbit. The pink rabbit was knitted by Gelitin, the Viennese art collective, as an outdoor sculpture for people to climb on, sleep on, and generally play with. It is made of soft, waterproof, materials and is stuffed with straw. Gelatin say it was "knitted by dozens of grannies out of pink wool".
Another view of the bunny, not a GE view:

This has been previously featured in Bytes. It is a naval base in California. Did not anyone, on viewing the plans, think to say "Hey guys, you know what this looks like?...”

Why is there a car on the side of the wall in this building in Westenbergstraat, Netherlands?

A native American listening to an iPod, or just mountainous terrain? It’s in Alberta, Canada

Another previously posted pic. This heart-shaped island in the Adriatic became a hit on Google Earth for Valentine's Day. The uninhabited island is only 130,000 square yards and is called Galesnjak. The owner didn't even know how perfectly this island off the Croatian coast was until he was swamped with requests from couples to stay there. 

Rhett Dashwood, a graphic designer from Australia, created the first Google Maps alphabet, featuring all 26 letters, using satellite images of natural features and buildings.

Google Earth numbers and punctuation, using only locations in The Netherlands, by Thomas de Bruin. 

Another alphabet, this one also by Thomas de Bruin using only images from his native Netherlands.

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Occasionally Google earth gets it wrong. The software supporting it apparently every now and then has some glitch that causes 3D images to be distorted. You can see a collection at:

Here are some:






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