Tuesday, March 4, 2014

Who? What? When? Where? Why? - Cunning Kick and Shirley Temple



Cunning kick
My friend Arthur told me that he had his wallet with him at a shop and discovered that he had no money in it when he had to pay for his order. Then a thought struck him: he told the shop assistant he would check the cunning kick and sure enough he found a $100 note in it. An elderly person nearby told him it had been many years since she had heard that expression. I told him I had never heard it. He explained that in bygone years it had meant a secret part of one’s wallet used to hide money from a wife.

I came across a comment as follows by a chap with the nickname “Swinger” on a golf website forum:

In the old days we use to call it the "Cunning kick", a hidden part of your wallet where you used to fold notes in small parcels and hide them for drinking and punting without the missus knowing about it. You would open your wallet and have nothing where you would normally have money , but hidden away is your cunning kick. 

http://forums.iseekgolf.com/topic/43138-keep-this-quiet/

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Shirley Temple (drink):


The main claim as to the originator of the Shirley Temple drink is an unknown bartender at Chasen’s, a Beverly Hills restaurant. It is believed that it was prepared for Shirley Temple when she visited in the 1930’s. Other claimants include the Brown Derby restaurant in Hollywood and the Royal Hawaiian in Hawaii. What is common to all claims is that the drink was invented by the chef as a response to her complaints at not having a drink the same as the ones her parents were having.

The drink is a non-alcoholic drink made with ginger ale and a splash of grenadine, garnished with a maraschino cherry. Today lemon-lime soda is often substituted for the ginger ale.


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