Saturday, June 16, 2018

Sydney Suburbs, continued: Bow Bowing, Box Hill, Bradbury, Brighton Le Sands



BOW BOWING
Location:
55 kilometres south-west of the Sydney CBD in the local government area of the City of Campbelltown
Name Origin:
The suburb Bow Bowing draws its name from a local creek. The creek's name is probably of aboriginal origin since it was originally spelt Boro Borang and later corrupted. The name Bow Bowing was only chosen for the suburb in 1975 and for more than one hundred years prior to that it was known as Saggart's Field after a local family. A school built in 1866 was named Saggart Field School although it was renamed Minto Public School in 1884
About:
·       The land in the area was purchased by the Housing Commission in 1976 with the intention of building over one thousand homes in the relatively small area of the new suburb. Local concerns, particularly over other Housing Commission developments in the area, forced the original plan to be shelved. The land was subsequently sold to private developers who built 350 homes in the area. The development was officially opened in 1990.
·       According to the 2011 census, there were 1,583 residents in Bow Bowing. In Bow Bowing, 63.9% of people were born in Australia. The most common other countries of birth were Philippines 6.1%, Fiji 3.9%, India 2.9%, New Zealand 2.8% and England 2.2%.

Gallery:

Aerial view of Bow Bowing

BOX HILL
Location:
42 kilometres north-west of the Sydney CBD in the local government area of The Hills Shire and part of the Hills District region.
Name Origin:
This area takes its name from either a stand of box trees that were once in the area or the fact that in the 19th century there were hunting boxes built on the tops of hills in this area. City people used to come to their country hunting boxes for a few days hunting and, perched on a hill, could aim at targets quite easily. One building has survived: 'The Hunting Lodge, Box Hill' thought to have been built by S.H. Terry on Governor Bligh's 'Copenhagen Farm'.
About:
·       Box Hill is a rural area on the outskirts of Sydney.

Gallery:

Box Hill
Box Wood plantation in Box Hill


BRADBURY
Location:
54 kilometres south-west of the Sydney CBD, in the local government area of the City of Campbelltown and is part of the Macarthur region.
Name Origin:
Bradbury was previously known as Sherwood Hills and is one of the more established suburbs of Campbelltown, with large-scale residential development beginning in the 1960s. It was named after William Bradbury, a local innkeeper in the 1820s and 30s. The area surrounding Manooka Reserve (beside The Parkway) was originally called Manooka Estate, but became part of Bradbury in the 1970s.
About:
·       Bradbury is said to be the location where Fisher's ghost (Frederick Fisher) appeared on a bridge post, to indicate where his body lay.
·       The name of the creek that runs through the suburb is called Fishers Ghost Creek.
·       On 17 June 1826 an English-born Australian farmer from Campbelltown named Frederick Fisher (born 28 August 1792 in London) suddenly disappeared. His friend and neighbour George Worrall claimed that Fisher had returned to England, and that before departing had given him power of attorney over his property and general affairs. Later, Worrall claimed that Fisher had written to him to advise that he was not intending to return to Australia, and giving his farm to Worrall.
Four months after Fisher's disappearance a respectable local man named John Farley, ran into the local hotel in a very agitated state. He told the astonished patrons that he had seen the ghost of Fred Fisher sitting on the rail of a nearby bridge. Farley related that the ghost had not spoken, but had merely pointed to a paddock beyond the creek, before disappearing.
Initially Farley's tale was dismissed, but the circumstances surrounding Fisher's disappearance eventually aroused sufficient suspicion that a police search of the paddock to which the ghost had pointed was undertaken - during which the remains of the murdered Fisher were discovered buried by the side of a creek. George Worrall was arrested for the crime, confessed, and subsequently hanged. Fred Fisher, whose lands he had coveted, was buried in the cemetery at St. Peter's Anglican Church in Campbelltown.
It has been suggested that Farley invented the ghost story as a way of concealing some other speculated source of his knowledge about the whereabouts of Fisher's body, but this cannot be confirmed.
·       A ten-day Fisher’s Ghost Festival has been held in the area since 1956.

Gallery:





Fisher’s Ghost Creek Bridge, 1950’s

Fisher’s Ghost Creek Bridge, 1950’s
  
BREAKFAST POINT
Location:
16 kilometres west of the Sydney central business district. It is in the local government area of the City of Canada Bay.
Name Origin:
According to historical records, the suburb name is derived from the first contact between Europeans and the traditional owners of the land, the Wangal Clan. The encounter took place on 5 February 1788 during Captain John Hunter's exploration of the Parramatta River, while Hunter was having breakfast. William Bradley, First Lieutenant on board HMS Sirius, recorded the following entry in the log:
We landed to cook breakfast on the opposite shore to them (Breakfast Pt.). We made signs to them to come over and waved green boughs. Soon after which 7 of them came over in 2 canoes and landed near our boats. They left their spears in the canoes and came to us. We tied beads etc. about them and left them our fire to dress their muscles which they went about as soon as our boats put off.
Hunter, who was later to become Governor of New South Wales, is also remembered in the name of the nearby suburb of Hunters Hill.[4]
About:
·       According to the 2011 census of Population, there were 2,744 residents in Breakfast Point. In Breakfast Point, 54.9% of people were born in Australia. The most common other countries of birth were China (excludes SARs and Taiwan) 7.7%, Korea, Republic of (South) 4.1%, England 3.5%, Hong Kong (SAR of China) 2.1% and Italy 2.0%.
·       Much of the area at Breakfast Point was occupied by the Mortlake Gas Works of the Australian Gaslight Company (AGL). AGL began developing the site from 1883. The Mortlake Gasworks site offered river access for colliers to bring coal and virtually unlimited space for expansion. The gas works remained in operation until the 1990s when in 1998 AGL, after a selected tender process, selected Rosecorp Pty. Ltd. to progressively acquire and develop the Mortlake site. Redevelopment has proceeded since then.
·       Breakfast Point is the location of one of the largest urban renewal projects in Sydney on a site formerly belonging to AGL. The New South Wales State Government took control of the approval process for the development from Canada Bay Council in August 2005, citing lengthy delays. Issues that arose between the council and the developer, Rosecorp, included the provision of public transport, public access to the area and its landscaping.

Gallery:

Panorama shot of Breakfast Point

Former Blacksmith's workshop, Breakfast Point, New South Wales. Built 1891, on the former AGL site now subdivided for housing.
  
 BRIGHTON LE SANDS
Location:
13 kilometres south-west of the Sydney CBD on the western shore of Botany Bay. Brighton-Le-Sands is in the local government area of the Bayside Council and is part of the St George area.
Name Origin:
Thomas Saywell (1837-1928), merchant and developer, was born in  England, but spent his early years in France with his parents, who returned to England in 1848 and migrated to Australia later that year.  After spending time on the goldfields Saywell set up as a tobacconist in Sydney in 1863.
He prospered and invested substantially in coal-mining and real estate. In the early 1880s Saywell foresaw that the construction of the Illawarra railway would create new suburbs in the sparsely settled area south of Cook's River; he bought an estate at Lady Robinson's Beach, Botany Bay, erected the fashionable New Brighton Hotel, a public bathing enclosure described as 'the best in Australia', and other amenities including a race-course. He planned to create a model suburb and seaside resort for working-class families.
On his suggestion the new suburb was named Brighton-le-Sands, the second part of the name being added to distinguish it from Brighton in England.
About:
·       Lady Robinsons Beach and Cook Park run along the eastern border of Brighton-Le-Sands, on Botany Bay. The beach is also commonly referred to as Brighton Beach and it is known for its off-white sand.
·       Brighton-Le-Sands features a mixture of low density houses, medium density flats, high rise apartments, retail, caf├ęs and restaurants. The Grand Parade runs along the foreshore and intersects with Bay Street, at the commercial centre. The higher density developments are located along these streets.

Gallery:

 Brighton Le Sands, 1948

Bridge Road, Brighton Le Sands, 1900’s

Thomas Saywell’s Brighton Baths, Brighton Le Sands

Tram and bus travelling north along The Grand Parade,near Teralba Rd, Brighton-le-Sands in 1949.

Bay Street, Brighton Le Sands, year unkown



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