Monday, August 6, 2012

Quote: Edmund Burke

 

“Because half-a-dozen grasshoppers under a fern make the field ring with their importunate chink, whilst thousands of great cattle, reposed beneath the shadow of the British oak, chew the cud and are silent, pray do not imagine that those who make the noise are the only inhabitants of the field; that of course they are many in number; or that, after all, they are other than the little shrivelled, meagre, hopping, though loud and troublesome insects of the hour."
-          Edmund Burke 

Edmund Burke (1729 -1797) was an Irish statesman, author, orator, political theorist and philosopher who, after moving to England, served for many years in the House of Commons of Great Britain as a member of the Whig party.  He is mainly remembered for his support of the cause of the American Revolution, and for his later opposition to the French Revolution. The latter led to his becoming the leading figure within the conservative faction of the Whig Party, which he dubbed the "Old Whigs", in opposition to the pro–French Revolution "New Whigs", led by Charles James Fox.  Burke was praised by both conservatives and liberals in the 19th century,  Since the 20th century, he has generally been viewed as the philosophical founder of modern Conservatism as well as a representative of classical liberalism. 

“All that's necessary for the forces of evil to win in the world is for enough good men to do nothing.”
-      Edmund Burke



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