Sunday, September 20, 2015

Sydney Suburbs: Arncliffe - Ashbury

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ARNCLIFFE:

Location:
11 kilometres south of Sydney CBD.

Name Origin:
Arncliffe's name comes from a small village called Arncliffe in North Yorkshire, England. The name appears in the Domesday Book of 1086, as 'Arneclif', meaning Eagle Cliff. When land speculator William Hirst, who was born in Yorkshire, created his subdivision in 1840 he called it The Village of Arncliffe Estate. The area did not become known as Arncliffe, however, for another 20 years, being originally called Cobblers Hill.

Comments:
Although Arncliffe began as the vegetable garden of Sydney, it is today a mostly residential area featuring low density detached and semi-detached houses and some medium density town houses and blocks of flats. There are also some areas of commercial and light industrial developments.

Gallery:

Arncliffe Railway Station

Arncliffe Railway Station, 1907

Arncliffe Railway Station, 1907

Arncliffe Post Office
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ARNDELL PARK:

Location:
A predominantly industrial suburb in the City of Blacktown in Western Sydney.

Name origin:
The suburb takes its name from Thomas Arndell who was appointed Assistant Surgeon to the settlement in New South Wales and arrived with the First Fleet. He later joined Captain Tench in 1789 in the journey of exploration from Prospect Hill to the Nepean River.

Gallery:

Memorial plaque for Thomas Arndell in Windsor NSW, his final resting place.
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ARTARMON:

Location:
9 kilometres north-west of Sydney

Name origin:
The suburb is believed to be named after the land granted to William Gore in 1810. Gore had arrived in Sydney in 1805 with Governor Bligh, who appointed him to the position of Provost-Marshall (equivalent to sheriff). Gore’s family home was Ardthelmon Castle (pronounced Art-e-mon), located near Raghley in Ireland, and the name was ‘adapted’ by Gore as Artarmon Estate. His residence from 1818 was a modest cottage on the estate named Artarmon House, which was replaced by a grand residence (also called Artarmon House) in 1869.

Comments:
  • During the 1850s orchards and market gardens were established in the area, while bricks were made in the area from 1828. By 1889, the brick industry at Gore Hill was the largest in New South Wales, and it laid the foundation for the establishment of the Artarmon Industrial Area in the 1950s.
  • The opening of the North Shore Railway on 1 January 1890 paved the way for Willoughby’s estates to be subdivided for residential development, but it was not until the opening of Artarmon railway station in 1898 that Artarmon Estate was subdivided and the urbanisation of the suburb commenced.
Gallery:

Hampden Road shopping centre, 1907
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ASHBURY:

Location:
9 kilometres south-west of Sydney.

Name origin:
The suburb was originally known as Goodlet’s Bush after an early settler, John Hay Goodlet. In 1926 a local primary school changed its name from South Ashfield to Ashbury Public School, being located between Ashfield and Canterbury and using the first and last syllables of those two names to form “Ashbury”.

Comments:
Back when I first moved to Ashfield, Ashbury was known for a giant hole in the ground that was being filled by being used as a tip. My God, it stank. Today that same hole and tip is a park, Peace Park, 

Gallery:

John Hay Goodlet

Peace Park

Peace Park

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