Saturday, December 26, 2015

Her Maj's Message, 2015


Extracts from the Queen's Christmas message yesterday:
At this time of year, few sights evoke more feelings of cheer and goodwill than the twinkling lights of a Christmas tree. 
The popularity of a tree at Christmas is due in part to my great-great grandparents, Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. 
After this touching picture was published, many families wanted a Christmas tree of their own, and the custom soon spread. 
In 1949, I spent Christmas in Malta as a newly-married naval wife. 
We have returned to that island over the years, including last month for a meeting of Commonwealth leaders, and this year I met another group of leaders: The Queen's Young Leaders, an inspirational group, each of them a symbol of hope in their own Commonwealth communities. 
'Losing a loved one' 
Gathering round the tree gives us a chance to think about the year ahead - I am looking forward to a busy 2016, though I have been warned I may have Happy Birthday sung to me more than once or twice. 
It also allows us to reflect on the year that has passed, as we think of those who are far away or no longer with us. 
Many people say the first Christmas after losing a loved one is particularly hard. But it's also a time to remember all that we have to be thankful for. 
It is true that the world has had to confront moments of darkness this year, but the Gospel of John contains a verse of great hope, often read at Christmas carol services: "The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it". 
. . . .  
There's an old saying that "it is better to light a candle than curse the darkness". 
There are millions of people lighting candles of hope in our world today. 
Christmas is a good time to be thankful for them, and for all that brings light to our lives. 
I wish you a very happy Christmas.



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