Thursday, November 21, 2019

Poetry Spot and Some Wordplay



Doppelganger

by James A. Lindon

Entering the lonely house with my wife
I saw him for the first time
Peering furtively from behind a bush --
Blackness that moved,
A shape amid the shadows,
A momentary glimpse of gleaming eyes
Revealed in the ragged moon.
A closer look (he seemed to turn) might have
Put him to flight forever --
I dared not
(For reasons that I failed to understand),
Though I knew I should act at once.

I puzzled over it, hiding alone,
Watching the woman as she neared the gate.
He came, and I saw him crouching
Night after night.
Night after night
He came, and I saw him crouching,
Watching the woman as she neared the gate.

I puzzled over it, hiding alone --
Though I knew I should act at once,
For reasons that I failed to understand
I dared not
Put him to flight forever.       

A closer look (he seemed to turn) might have
Revealed in the ragged moon.
A momentary glimpse of gleaming eyes
A shape amid the shadows,
Blackness that moved.

Peering furtively from behind a bush,
I saw him for the first time,
Entering the lonely house with my wife.


James Albert Lindon (1914 – 1979) was an English puzzle enthusiast and poet specializing in light verse, constrained writing, and children's poetry.

Lindon has been described as the greatest English writer of comic verse and his skill at wordplay has been similarly acclaimed.

In addition to being a poet, Lindon was an accomplished writer and solver of puzzles, especially those in recreational mathematics.




By the way, the above poem, which is quite scary, is a line palindrome, one that reads the same from the botoom line up as from the top line down.








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